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're having this huge argument right now. and i think partly because the obama administration about whether the profit incentive is even relevant in today's world. >> i think that's a fair point. i think it's a very important argument to have. by the way, higher education, the for profit guys are the ones paying taxes, both property and income taxes, whereas the not for property guys are the ones receiving subsidies. as far as i'm concerned, money is money. the only difference in private and public money is ideological. you draw a line between the two. public money becomes purer -- >> but it's worth ten cents on the dollar. >> i don't disagree with you. >> you're one of the old democrats. you're looking around saying what am i. >> i don't -- by the way, it's sort of what we were talking about earlier with iran. i don't think it's a question of choosing one or the other. i think you need to have a healthy balance of both. but if you start off with a regulatory bias against the for profit sector. >> you do. >> i understand, i don't disagree. >> i'm appealing to you, stand up and be -- >> i'm
pleased with the kind of response he's been getting from the obama administration about security. and depending on where you look, congressman, you know, people on the right to some extent say there was never even any thought to getting security in there. and people on the left say, you know, when i had a kid, should i have gotten rid of my kid when i saw a few glitches? no, you fix the glitches. it's a wide spectrum. what wept into the planning for security? >> well, unfortunately, not much. this isn't about wanting the site to fail itself. you're pushing people. people have lost their health care. they need to be able to access this site in order to get on and get a policy by january. so that's our concern. and what you've done is you've opened them up to a level of risk using this website i've never seen. standard site of this size would be about 500,000 lines of code, roughly, maybe a little less. the code in is about 5 million lines of code. and it has never been thoroughly tested. and so we know of a very low level access problem and meaning that somebody cou
they make. and i think that's a good thing. >> you credit the obama administration for the auto sales for saving the auto sector? >> no. because frankly bush was the one who started to say the auto companies and was criticized for having done so. obama came in and continued it. >> i think it was two administrations working together. >> well, maybe. i'll give you that. but on the other hand, the automobile industry is vastly cyclical. none of you remember, but go back to the tesla story in the stock. you can't make it in the automotive industry. >> so nice of you to remember i don't remember that. >> i hope you don't but i do. not because it's not a good car, people say it is. but it takes so much money to plan in the automotive industry to live through the crashes. when you stop losing top line, it drops right to the bottom and costs a lot of money to play in the game. >> they've really restructured the auto companies. they're in much better shape than they were beforehand. >> so isn't the rest of the world in autos. they're all better, but it'll still be cyclical, becky. >> yeah. >>
at the university of chicago school of business and former chairman of the council of economic advisers in the obama administration. our guest host this morning has been gary stern, continues to be, former president at the federal reserve bank of minneapolis where there's a lot of lakes. and arthur brooks, president -- aren't there? >> yes, there are. >> and arthur -- i knew i had that right. arthur brooks president of aei. >> nailed it. >> american enterprise institute. >> american enterprise institute. >> for young enterprisers. all right. you want to? >> i don't want to take your jobs report away. let's start with mark zandi. what's your number today and why? >> 200,000, it should be a strong report, unemployment should fall to 7.2. i don't think the trend has changed, though. we've been getting 175,000 per month for about three years, i think that's roughly where we are. i don't think we've broken out yet. i think we need stronger gdp growth. and even though we got a good q3 number, we're still growing 2%. i don't think we have enough g the, p to create more jobs. >> jerry, put this in context.
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4